What are the structures and functions of the judiciary


What are the structures and functions of the judiciary

The judiciary is the system of courts that interprets and applies the law in the name of the state.

 

The judiciary is an important part of the Indian government, and it is responsible for interpreting and applying the law. The judiciary has a hierarchical structure, with the Supreme Court at the top followed by the High Courts, and then the lower courts. The judiciary also has a number of other functions, such as providing legal advice to the government and hearing appeals from lower courts.

 
The Judiciary is one of the three organs of the Indian government, and it is responsible for interpreting and applying the law. The judiciary has a hierarchical structure, with the Supreme Court at the top followed by the High Courts, and then the lower courts.
 
The Supreme Court is the highest court in India, and it consists of a Chief Justice and 30 other judges. The Supreme Court has the original jurisdiction over disputes between states or between the central government and one or more states, and it also hears appeals from High Courts.
 
The High Courts are located in each state capital, and they have general supervisory authority over all subordinate courts within their jurisdictions. Each High Court consists of a Chief Justice and several other judges. Cases can be appealed from High Courts to the Supreme Court if they involve questions of law or if they raise important issues that need to be resolved by the highest court.
 
There are also numerous subordinate courts, which include district courts (the lowest level of criminal court) and magistrate’s courts (the lowest level of civil court). Smaller villages may have only village panchayats (local councils) to resolve disputes.
 
The judiciary also has other functions such as providing legal advice to the government and hearing appeals from lower courts. In addition, the judiciary is responsible for ensuring that the laws are followed and that the rights of citizens are protected.
 

The Structure of the Indian Judiciary

The Indian judiciary has a hierarchical structure with the Supreme Court at the top, followed by the High Courts, and then the subordinate courts.
 
The Supreme Court is the highest court of appeal in India. It comprises the Chief Justice and 30 other judges appointed by the President of India. The Supreme Court has original, appellate, and advisory jurisdiction.
 
At the level below the Supreme Court, there are High Courts.
 
They exercise control over a state or a union territory. Each High Court consists of a Chief Justice and such other number of judges as may be determined by Parliament.
 
Subordinate courts include District Courts, Taluka Courts, Munsifs Magistrates' Courts, and Village Panchayat Courts etc.
 
The Supreme Court is the highest court in India, and it is responsible for interpreting the Constitution and setting precedent for other courts to follow. The High Courts are subordinate to the Supreme Court and have original jurisdiction over matters within their geographical area. The lower courts include the District Courts and the Subordinate Courts, which are further divided into criminal and civil courts.
 
The Indian judiciary is an independent body that ensures the fair and impartial administration of justice in the country.
The Supreme Court of India is the highest court in the country and is responsible for interpreting the Constitution and setting precedent for other courts to follow. The court is composed of a Chief Justice and 30 Associate Justices, who are appointed by the President of India. The court has original jurisdiction over matters of national importance, such as disputes between states, and appellate jurisdiction over decisions made by lower courts. The High Courts are subordinate to the Supreme Court and have original jurisdiction over matters within their geographical area. There are 24 High Courts in India, each with a Chief Justice and several Associate Justices. The High Courts have both civil and criminal divisions. The lower courts include the District Courts and the Subordinate Courts, which are further divided into criminal and civil courts. These courts hear cases that fall within their jurisdictions.
 

The Functions of the Judiciary in India

The Judiciary in India is hierarchical in structure.
It has the Supreme Court at its apex, followed by the High Courts, and then the subordinate courts. The judiciary also has a number of other functions such as providing legal advice to the government and hearing appeals from lower courts. In addition, the judiciary is responsible for ensuring that the laws are followed and that the rights of citizens are protected.

The Supreme Court is the highest court of India. It consists of the Chief Justice and 30 other judges, all of whom are appointed by the President of India. The Supreme Court has original jurisdiction in cases involving disputes between two or more states, and it also hears appeals from the High Courts.

The High Courts are the next level down in the Indian judicial hierarchy. There are 24 High Courts in India, each with jurisdiction over a particular state or group of states. The High Courts have original jurisdiction in cases involving serious crimes, and they also hear appeals from the subordinate courts.

Subordinate Courts are lower-level courts that deal with less serious criminal matters and civil disputes. There are three types of Subordinate Courts: Magistrates’ Courts, District Courts, and Taluka Panchayat Courts. Magistrates’ Courts deal with minor criminal offences such as theft and assault; District Courts handle more serious criminal cases; and Taluka Panchayat Courts resolve disputes between villages.

The judiciary also has a number of other functions such as providing legal advice to the government, and hearing appeals from lower courts. In addition, the judiciary is responsible for ensuring that the laws are followed and that the rights of citizens are protected.
 
The judiciary has a number of important functions in India, including interpreting laws, advising the government on legal matters, hearing appeals from lower courts, and ensuring that justice is carried out fairly and impartially. The judiciary also plays a vital role in protecting fundamental rights guaranteed by the Constitution.
 
Read on to learn more about the structure and functions of the Indian judiciary.
The Indian judiciary is divided into three levels: the Supreme Court, the High Courts, and the lower courts. The Supreme Court is the highest court in India and its decisions are binding on all other courts.

The Supreme Court is composed of a Chief Justice and 25 other judges. They are appointed by the President of India on recommendation of the Collegium, which consists of the Chief Justice and four senior-most judges of the Supreme Court.

The Supreme Court acts as an appellate court for cases decided by High Courts. It also advises the government on legal matters and hears appeals from lower courts.

The High Courts are located in each state capital and exercise jurisdiction over that particular state. They are headed by a Chief Justice and consist of several other judges. The main functions of High Courts include interpreting laws, hearing appeals from lower courts, and ensuring that justice is carried out fairly and impartially.

Lower courts are located in district headquarters across India. They include subordinate judiciary such as civil judges (including small causes), criminal judges (sessions judge), family courts, consumer forums etc., who hear cases relating to specific areas of law such as contract disputes, property disputes, crimes etc.

The Indian judiciary is an independent and impartial system that ensures justice is carried out fairly and impartially. It plays a vital role in protecting fundamental rights guaranteed by the Constitution.
 
Conclusion
  • The judiciary is an important part of the Indian government.
  • It is responsible for interpreting and applying the law.
  • The judiciary has a hierarchical structure, with the Supreme Court at the top followed by the High Courts, and then the lower courts.
  • The judiciary also has a number of other functions, such as providing legal advice to the government and hearing appeals from lower courts.
  • The Indian judiciary is independent and has a long history of fair and impartial decision-making.
 
However, the judiciary faces a number of challenges, including a large backlog of cases, insufficient funding, and political interference. Despite these challenges, the judiciary remains an important institution in India and plays a crucial role in ensuring that the rule of law is upheld.
 
The judiciary is an important part of Indian democracy and plays a vital role in upholding the rule of law. It is independent from both executive and legislative branches of government, which helps to ensure that justice is carried out fairly and impartially.

Kavita Sethi

Kavita Sethi

Content Writter

Having a keen hobby in writing from university days. I have been writing articles, blogs on various elements. Presently working with Juris Academy as a content writer. Diving deep into the on-going generation and writing on same is what I do.


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